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Queen Anne Court Tours: Open House

Open House 2020  Saturday 19 September  & Sunday 20 September 2020: 

We are sorry, but this tour is now fully booked.

We do not have a waiting list for these tours, however spaces may become available on the day if people do not show up. In this case, places will be allocated at the check in point on a first come, first served basis, and we will only be able to allocate spaces up to the limit of 5 per tour.

 

Check in point is entrance to Queen Anne Court ,University of Greenwich (entrance from Lower Grand Square Side). Please aim to arrive 5-10 minutes before your tour start time. Tour guides will leave promptly.

(Tickets are free & are bookable online until 5pm Wednesday 16th September, any remaining tickets will be available only in person on the day of the tours from the check in point. Tours are run hourly between 11am until 3pm with last tour leaving at 2pm)

 

Old Royal Naval College - Queen Anne Court; Sir Christopher Wren, 1689

Queen Anne Court

Queen Anne Court now houses the new headquarters of the University. It was begun in 1689 to mirror Webb’s King Charles Building but was not completed until c.1749 when Thomas Ripley built the end pavilions facing the river.

The east front consists of 23 bays in Portland stone ashlar (dressed stone). The whole façade is rusticated with quintuple keystones above each window.

Striking the viewer on approach is the arcaded central bay built by Hawksmoor in 1701-05. It’s pediment rests on the entablature supported by Corinthian columns and it projects forward from the low-pitched slated roof. The windows beneath it are deeply recessed.

The end pavilions are of 3 storeys in comparison to the main part of the building, which is only 2. The third storeys of the pavilions end in a balustraded parapet. Here the entablature is also supported by the Corinthian order but in the form of pilasters. As the highest order of the classical orders these add even greater splendour to the building.

The western part of the court remained a brick body until given its interior in 1712 and finally its stone façade in 1725.

Inside highlights include the council boardroom and the basement of the early Stuart undercroft from the former Royal Palace of Placentia survives. Built in 1605-06 it simple with octagonal piers and chamfered ribs.

 

Please note Open House tickets are not valid to enter the Painted Hall.

If you do not have a valid 12month Adult ticket to the Painted Hall, shortly after booking your Open House tour tickets you will be emailed our exclusive offer discount code to Buy one Adult ticket* and get the second adult ticket half price

*We cannot refund tickets that have already been purchased.

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Open House 2020  Saturday 19 September  & Sunday 20 September 2020: 

We are sorry, but this tour is now fully booked.

We do not have a waiting list for these tours, however spaces may become available on the day if people do not show up. In this case, places will be allocated at the check in point on a first come, first served basis, and we will only be able to allocate spaces up to the limit of 5 per tour.

 

Check in point is entrance to Queen Anne Court ,University of Greenwich (entrance from Lower Grand Square Side). Please aim to arrive 5-10 minutes before your tour start time. Tour guides will leave promptly.

(Tickets are free & are bookable online until 5pm Wednesday 16th September, any remaining tickets will be available only in person on the day of the tours from the check in point. Tours are run hourly between 11am until 3pm with last tour leaving at 2pm)

 

Old Royal Naval College - Queen Anne Court; Sir Christopher Wren, 1689

Queen Anne Court

Queen Anne Court now houses the new headquarters of the University. It was begun in 1689 to mirror Webb’s King Charles Building but was not completed until c.1749 when Thomas Ripley built the end pavilions facing the river.

The east front consists of 23 bays in Portland stone ashlar (dressed stone). The whole façade is rusticated with quintuple keystones above each window.

Striking the viewer on approach is the arcaded central bay built by Hawksmoor in 1701-05. It’s pediment rests on the entablature supported by Corinthian columns and it projects forward from the low-pitched slated roof. The windows beneath it are deeply recessed.

The end pavilions are of 3 storeys in comparison to the main part of the building, which is only 2. The third storeys of the pavilions end in a balustraded parapet. Here the entablature is also supported by the Corinthian order but in the form of pilasters. As the highest order of the classical orders these add even greater splendour to the building.

The western part of the court remained a brick body until given its interior in 1712 and finally its stone façade in 1725.

Inside highlights include the council boardroom and the basement of the early Stuart undercroft from the former Royal Palace of Placentia survives. Built in 1605-06 it simple with octagonal piers and chamfered ribs.

 

Please note Open House tickets are not valid to enter the Painted Hall.

If you do not have a valid 12month Adult ticket to the Painted Hall, shortly after booking your Open House tour tickets you will be emailed our exclusive offer discount code to Buy one Adult ticket* and get the second adult ticket half price

*We cannot refund tickets that have already been purchased.